Teaching Business Communication is packed with a wealth of new ideas you can use to add value to your course and make it more instructive.

Why Rejection Hurts So Much — and What to Do About iIt

"Psychologist Guy Winch shares some practical tips for soothing the sting of rejection. Rejections are the most common emotional wound we sustain in daily life. Our risk of rejection used to be limited by the size of our immediate social circle or dating pools. Today, thanks to electronic communications, social media platforms and dating apps, each of us is connected to thousands of people, any of whom might ignore our posts, chats, texts, or dating profiles, and leave us feeling rejected as a result."

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Improve Your Students’ Knowledge of Interpersonal Communication

"Conversational skills, active listening, negotiation, conflict resolution, nonverbal communication, collaboration, and productive meetings—prepare students for the demands of workplace communication with Excellence in Business Communication's expanded coverage of interpersonal communication."

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Why Rejection Hurts So Much — and What to Do about It

"Psychologist Guy Winch shares some practical tips for soothing the sting of rejection."

Read the full article . . .

Do You Come Across as Arrogant? 5 Workplace Behaviors to Curb

"Many of us have had to battle the specter of arrogance at one time or another. No one is perfect, and the particularly intelligent must be especially careful about slipping into egotistical behavior," writes Joel Garfinkle (photo, left) in a piece at SmartBrief.com.

"If you worry about being perceived as arrogant at work, read on to check your tendencies and learn about the alternative habits you should be perfecting. Even the most humble have to be wary of any action that can seem arrogant — it’s the wrong way to get noticed, especially when you’re working to climb the corporate ladder."

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Here’s What Introverts Find So Annoying about What Extroverts Think

According to Christina DesMarais (photo, left), "Anywhere from a third to half of the population fits the definition of being introverted, meaning these people are at their best in quieter environments compared with the extroverts who do well with a lot of stimulation. And if you're someone who clearly identifies with being on either side of the fence, you know how challenging it can be living and working with people who can be so different from yourself. Coming from the introverted camp, here are several things I wish extroverts understood."

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