Why the Future of Social Media Will Depend on Artificial Intelligence

Social media platforms like Facebook and LinkedIn must use AI (Artificial Intelligence) to make sense of the sea of human data coming at them. So, you can say, future of social media really depends upon AI.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.smartdatacollective.com

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How to Make Blogging Easier with Artificial Intelligence

Blogging can be made significantly easier, faster, and more impactful using artificial intelligence. Here’s how.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.marketingaiinstitute.com

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From Chatbots to VR: How Technology Is Forcing Business Communication to Both Poles of the Humanness Spectrum

Businesses can only operate as effectively as they can communicate. The ability to share information, develop relationships, and negotiate will define enterprise success."

Sourced through Scoop.it from: expand.openviewpartners.com

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One Author Team Is Remarkably Reversing a Trend in Lagging Technology Coverage

Business communication textbooks have all lagged in covering communication technology, but one author team is remarkably reversing the trend

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Science: You Now Have a Shorter Attention Span Than a Goldfish

"The average attention span for the notoriously ill-focused goldfish is nine seconds, but according to a new study from Microsoft Corp., people now generally lose concentration after eight seconds, highlighting the affects of an increasingly digitalized lifestyle on the brain."

Sourced through Scoop.it from: time.com

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The Best Search Engines of 2018

There are so many search engines out there! But you only need these tools to find the best of the web today. Bing, Dogpile, Google Scholar and more!

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.lifewire.com

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Online Magazine: Teaching a Modern Business Communication Course

Teaching a Modern Business Communication Couse is an online magazine by Bovee & Thill, authors of the leading textbooks in business communication, featuring resources for business communication and business writing instructors. Recent posts include 

Do You Know the Key Topics That Are Disrupting Business Communication Course Content and Altering Lectures?
The Top Ten Words of the Year As Selected by Merriam-Webster
20 Words That You're Probably Using Incorrectly
27 Fascinating Maps That Show How Americans Speak English Differently Across the U.S.
If You Want Students to Pay Attention, Use an Ugly Font Like Comic Sans
27 Ways the Business Communication Course Can Help Your Students

12 Words You and Your Students May Be Mispronouncing

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The Future of Communication: Haptic Technologies

As the most intimate form of communication, touch can convey shades of emotion and meaning in ways that other forms can’t match. Think of the range of messages you can send by the way you greet someone, for example. A firm handshake, a light kiss on the cheek, an awkward embrace, and a fist bump all send different nonverbal signals.

 

Touch is a vital aspect of human-to-human and human-to-machine interaction, but it is missing from most forms of digital communication. You can’t give someone a hearty handshake over email or feel the vibration patterns of a machine while viewing it over a video link.

 

However, the field of haptic technology is enabling touch and tactile sensations in a growing number of ways. Mobile devices and wearables such as smartwatches are incorporating haptic input and output in ways that simulate the nuances of human touch or offer sensory substitution—using haptic feedback to translate visual or auditory information into vibration and pressure. When combined with virtual reality, haptics can create simulations so realistic they are being used to train surgeons and nuclear power plant technicians. . .

Sourced through Scoop.it from: blog.businesscommunicationnetwork.com

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The Future of Communication: Augmented Writing

What’s the best way to say this?

That’s a never-ending question for the typical business communicator. For just about anything beyond the simplest messages, we can never be entirely sure that we’ve found the most powerful words or crafted the most effective phrases. We have to send our missives out into the ether and hope we’ve done our best.

Moreover, in many cases, we get only one chance to hit the mark. In contrast to interactive conversations (in person or online), where we get instant feedback and can adjust the message if needed, a lot of business writing is a one-shot affair and we’ll never know if we’ve been as effective as we could be.

Digital tools have been assisting writers for decades, as far back as spell checkers that predate the PC era, but most haven’t done much beyond applying simple rules. However, recent advances in natural language processing show some potential to fill this feedback void by providing instantaneous advice about the effectiveness of our language. . .”

Sourced through Scoop.it from: blog.businesscommunicationnetwork.com

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The Future of Communication: Real-Time Translation

Trying to converse in a language in which you are not fully fluent presents a rather staggering cognitive workload. As a listener, you have to convert the incoming sounds to discrete words and assemble those words into coherent phrases and sentences in order to extract the meaning—and if the other party uses idioms or slang, the task can get exponentially harder.

 

And unlike reading a written document, you have to do all this processing almost instantaneously, without the luxury of going back over something you didn’t get.

 

As a speaker, you have to find the right words, assemble them into phrases and sentences using the language’s grammar rules, and then pronounce them all correctly enough so they make sense to the other party. Honing this level of proficiency can take years of study and practice.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: blog.businesscommunicationnetwork.com

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